Overview of the Slider Crank.

mechanism Crank



A slider-crank mechanism (also known as crank-slider mechanism) is a four-link mechanism with three revolute  joints and one prismatic, or sliding, joint. The rotation of the crank drives the linear movement the slider, or the expansion of gases against a sliding piston in a cylinder can drive the rotation of the crank.



There are two types of slider-cranks: in-line and offset.
In-line: An in-line slider-crank has its slider positioned so the line of travel of the hinged joint of the slider passes through the base joint of the crank. This creates a symmetric slider movement back and forth as the crank rotates.


Offset: If the line of travel of the hinged joint of the slider does not pass through the base pivot of the crank, the slider movement is not symmetric. It moves faster in one direction than the other. This is called a quick-return mechanism.

Slider-crank mechanism can also be said to be an arrangement of mechanical parts designed to convert straight-line motion to rotary motion, as in a reciprocating piston engine, or to convert rotary motion to straight-line motion, as in a reciprocating piston pump. The basic nature of the mechanism and the relative motion of the parts can best be described with the aid of the accompanying figure, in which the moving parts are lightly shaded.



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